Untitled

May 18
finndahero:

theories-of-ooo:

This could be why Finn is afraid of the ocean: it caused the death of his mother.
Amazingly perfectly awesome Theory from: Anon.

This. Scares. Me.

finndahero:

theories-of-ooo:

This could be why Finn is afraid of the ocean: it caused the death of his mother.

Amazingly perfectly awesome Theory from: Anon.

This. Scares. Me.

May 18

disneyaddictgirl:

For every laugh, there should be a tear.

Oh god I can’t handle this

Fox and the Hound?? Beauty and the Beast?? Oh god the Beauty and the Beast one killed me…Both fantastically beautiful scenes…both for different reasons….*curls up in a ball*

May 06
hausofdiamond:

Awesome hair style

hausofdiamond:

Awesome hair style

May 04
akumyo:

chompass:

OK HERE WE GO
This is simple and Quick, I’ll get more in Depth later.
HOW TO FACEBEND or Draw Faces like a Raving Idiot
Alright, the first rule of facial expressions that I have is no face is sacred. Not a one. 
If you want to draw extreme expressions, you’re going to have to sacrifice some “beauty”. 
That’s just the bottom line. 
Wrinkles and Skin creases are your key to making a face express. Of course I’m not a MASTER at this, nor am I the BEST EVER, I’m just sharing what I’ve larnd. 

Notice in this side by side, the same concept is exhibited, however, with the use of correctly placed, exaggerated facial creases and wrinkles, the faces become far more expressive rather than expressionless passionless blobs. 
Another important thing to pay attention to is your characters eyes.
Eyes are one of the most important things when considering this type of thing.
Know where your eyesockets are, abuse eyelids. Eyelids are also skin which can be represented as wrinkles or creases that can add to the expression of your character. 
Another Rule I have
The face is a rubber mask for you to bend, pull, stretch and abuse to make something as expressive as possible (within stylistic reason)

You ARE allowed to stretch facial anatomy in order to make something more expressive. You are allowed to apply cartoon physics to something that is drawn outside of the realm of realism.
Don’t keep yourself stuck on “what is physically possible”. If you want to express, get a little messy. Experiment!
Of course there ARE limitations. You CAN stretch a face too far before it starts looking “wrong” or “out of place”. 
Another important thing is to Keep your Exaggerations true to the style you’re working in.
However, every style has room for expression and exaggeration. You just need to find out how much and how far you can stretch things before it starts looking bad or wrong. 
This is really rough and I’ll do another one in the future I promise!

Okay I’ve seen this floating around my dash and I feel I need to make a few points/possible corrections. Tutorials are something I’m very, very particular about because it’s not just a drawing but something people may use as a template or guideline. If you pass along the wrong advice you are potentially leading younger artists in the wrong direction. 
If you want to continue this tutorial there are a few things that I feel need to be addressed. Particularly in the first image.
1. The face is not in a fixed location. While you have addressed that “facial features” can be squashed and stretched, the head and body have been ignored. The face has underlying structure (bone/muscle) so when the face moves, the head should should change with it. The facial structure also determines where wrinkles form. An older character is going to have prominent wrinkles in a few locations depending on their personality (An angry character has heavy wrinkles near their nose if they sneer a lot. Laugh lines around their eyes if they’re jovial, etc.) 
2. Facial expressions are important, but if you want to really bring the point home- USE BODY LANGUAGE. An angry person isn’t going to just sneer, they’re going to tense up. A sad person is going to hang low and drag their feet. The facial expression is just the most obvious clue into these emotions.
I’m not very confident with my own facial expressions, I feel that I need to improve how I exaggerate the facial structure, things kinda slide around if I’m not careful. So instead I’ll just point to one of the best animators in the business: Glen Keane

Here is a series of images of how he did the bodywork and expressions for “Beast” from the Beauty and the Beast: http://livlily.blogspot.com/2010/11/beauty-and-beast-1991.html

akumyo:

chompass:

OK HERE WE GO

This is simple and Quick, I’ll get more in Depth later.

HOW TO FACEBEND or Draw Faces like a Raving Idiot

Alright, the first rule of facial expressions that I have is no face is sacred. Not a one. 

If you want to draw extreme expressions, you’re going to have to sacrifice some “beauty”. 

That’s just the bottom line. 

Wrinkles and Skin creases are your key to making a face express. Of course I’m not a MASTER at this, nor am I the BEST EVER, I’m just sharing what I’ve larnd. 

image

Notice in this side by side, the same concept is exhibited, however, with the use of correctly placed, exaggerated facial creases and wrinkles, the faces become far more expressive rather than expressionless passionless blobs. 

Another important thing to pay attention to is your characters eyes.

Eyes are one of the most important things when considering this type of thing.

Know where your eyesockets are, abuse eyelids. Eyelids are also skin which can be represented as wrinkles or creases that can add to the expression of your character. 

Another Rule I have

The face is a rubber mask for you to bend, pull, stretch and abuse to make something as expressive as possible (within stylistic reason)

image

You ARE allowed to stretch facial anatomy in order to make something more expressive. You are allowed to apply cartoon physics to something that is drawn outside of the realm of realism.

Don’t keep yourself stuck on “what is physically possible”. If you want to express, get a little messy. Experiment!

Of course there ARE limitations. You CAN stretch a face too far before it starts looking “wrong” or “out of place”. 

Another important thing is to Keep your Exaggerations true to the style you’re working in.

However, every style has room for expression and exaggeration. You just need to find out how much and how far you can stretch things before it starts looking bad or wrong. 

This is really rough and I’ll do another one in the future I promise!

Okay I’ve seen this floating around my dash and I feel I need to make a few points/possible corrections. Tutorials are something I’m very, very particular about because it’s not just a drawing but something people may use as a template or guideline. If you pass along the wrong advice you are potentially leading younger artists in the wrong direction. 

If you want to continue this tutorial there are a few things that I feel need to be addressed. Particularly in the first image.

1. The face is not in a fixed location. While you have addressed that “facial features” can be squashed and stretched, the head and body have been ignored. The face has underlying structure (bone/muscle) so when the face moves, the head should should change with it. The facial structure also determines where wrinkles form. An older character is going to have prominent wrinkles in a few locations depending on their personality (An angry character has heavy wrinkles near their nose if they sneer a lot. Laugh lines around their eyes if they’re jovial, etc.) 

2. Facial expressions are important, but if you want to really bring the point home- USE BODY LANGUAGE. An angry person isn’t going to just sneer, they’re going to tense up. A sad person is going to hang low and drag their feet. The facial expression is just the most obvious clue into these emotions.

I’m not very confident with my own facial expressions, I feel that I need to improve how I exaggerate the facial structure, things kinda slide around if I’m not careful. So instead I’ll just point to one of the best animators in the business: Glen Keane

image

Here is a series of images of how he did the bodywork and expressions for “Beast” from the Beauty and the Beast: http://livlily.blogspot.com/2010/11/beauty-and-beast-1991.html

May 04
ginandbird:

define yourself by what you love… not by what you hate…

ginandbird:

define yourself by what you love… not by what you hate…

Apr 23
Apr 23
Apr 23
dboybaker:

The stages of procrastination

dboybaker:

The stages of procrastination

Apr 23
Apr 23